PICKING UP THE PIECES WITH PASSION

MARY QUANT is my inspiration for the third in this series of ideas for the future. We met after a shop-within-a-shop launch in Brown’s of Chester when I travelled with her and her business partner, husband, Alexander Plunket Greene to Manchester Airport. He was full of bright ideas on how to pick up the Fashion industry during an economic downturn.

Now we’re in the midst of a recession, you know, we need sharp clothes rather than peasant looks to underpin an optimistic outlook.” he told me.

REALLY it was his wife’s ingenuity which was the key to their success. He praised it saying, “Mary and her team are like French couturiers. We don’t take great whacks out of the business. Our first motive is a passionate interest in the goods.”

Journalism reveals Mary Quant’s importance as a guide for those who follow. When designer, Luella Bartley, was interviewed and photographed with Quant, for Vogue’s 90th anniversary, in 2009, she held that the Fashion industry could learn much from Quant by Quant, her idol’s own record of events.

Before Bartley launched her own international Fashion label she had read the autobiography five times. First published in 1966, when she was just 30 years of age, it chronicles Quant’s early life, her Fashion projects and inventions and is one of very few, if any, books to have Profit margins and Stock difficulties listed in its index.

mq 3Here Anton Storey captures the moment when Luella Bartley met her idol at a David Bailey photoshoot for the Vogue anniversary feature. There’s no surprise she was, as she said, ‘fizzing with excitement.’

SUCH FUN!

Do any of us have enough ‘fun’?

The last time we can be sure we were glimpsing the idea of fun’s potential seems to have been the 1960s.  So now the word is the super signifier for that decade.

Used by Barbara Hulanicki on her ‘Desert Island Discs,’ by Miranda Hart’s fictional mother, often in interviews with Mary Quant; it expresses the possibility of freedom  and pleasure.

Fizzing with the excitements left over from the take-up of Modernism, in the 1950s, by the 60s for the first time in history the young had money to spend.  Quant, Hulanicki, et al were there waiting for their Art School educations to liberalise the rest and so we began to spend every night, ‘out’!

The moment when it was possible to be having the most fun is surely when Modernism morphed into to its ironic younger sister, the multifaceted, ducking, dodging, diving, diva, post-Modernism.

The revolutionary, tone-setting, Biba brought in well-designed clothes and accessories for a new object-of-desire-hungry demographic.

Brighton Art college graduate Fashion illustrator Barbara Hulanicki opened a mail order clothing company with her husband, Stephen Fitz-Simon.  Their Postal Boutique was overwhelmed with orders for a sleeveless gingham shift dress featured in the ‘Daily Mirror.’

Image