Audrey Hepburn and Breakfast at Givenchy’s

HUBERT DE GIVENCHY was thrilled by his relationship with Hollywood through Audrey Hepburn and said, ‘After Sabrina, Audrey requested my clothes for all her films with a contemporary setting, which is how I came to design the outfits she wore in Funny Face, Love in the Afternoon, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Charade, Paris when it Sizzles and How to Steal a Million.

 It was suggested that her influence was so powerful, their friendship so constant, that there was a symbiotic relationship between the French designer and the Belgian actress.

As well as clothes for the films he also made her dresses for her second wedding, her sons’ christenings, and their christening gowns. The Givenchy clothes, Audrey Hepburn wore, symbolize the designer at the height of his powers.

In his use of silk prints, embroidered fabrics he drew on the expertise of skilled French textile workers. In his flawlessly detailed separates, high-style coats and elegant ball gowns he represented the matchless art of Parisian haute couture.

We might ask the question, ‘Did Audrey create Givenchy or was it the other way round?’   American designer, Ralph Lauren, knowing the value of serendipity, was to say that Audrey Hepburn could pick what was right for her from his own collections and added:

You could take Audrey into Sears, Roebuck or Givenchy or an army surplus store – it didn’t matter, she’d put something on and you’d say, ‘It’s her!’ Very few people can do that.

He also thought the balance in the relationship with the French couturier was tipped in favour of the actress:

“I truly feel Audrey gave Givenchy a look. As time went on, they collaborated, but I think she picked what was Audrey out of Givenchy.”

From FASHION, MEDIA, PROMOTION, the new black magic, in tribute to de Givenchy on his death 12th March 2018.

Tiffany's

 

Tess and Claudia’s lips

SEEING Tess Daly and Claudia Winkelman on ‘It Takes Two,’ yesterday, I thought how flattering their lip colour is and wondered if I should try to match it by a visit to Boots or Clarins.

Small experiment at home later realise I can achieve the warm pinkish paleness by mixing  cosmetics from my bag.

There are lipstick moments in many movies but the Tess/Claudia colour is reflected in ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s as Hepburn makes up her face to leave New York to seek her fortunes abroad.

Lipstick

The 1961 American romantic comedy film directed by Blake Edwards, written by George Axelrod, is based on Truman Capote’s novella of the same name, starring Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard

It’s a devastating moment for Peppard’s character but wonderful for Burberry who is using the still to promote a seasonal shade.